When I was younger. Part One:

Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Tue Oct 15, 2013 2:26 am

THE PLACE I WAS BORN:
The village of Swavesey lies about 8 miles north of Cambridge in the East of England. This was the place where I took my first steps and was my entire world for the first few years of my life. My parents didn’t have a car, and in fact neither of them had a driving licence. So the only time I ever left the village was with my mum to make the 4 or 5 mile trip to the local market town of St.Ives on the bus.
 Mostly I used to love our trips to St.Ives, because there was always the outside chance that I might get a small treat...money permitting of course. However, there were some occasions when I really didn’t want to go to St.Ives!
 You see St.Ives was also the place where the family dentist had his practice. My dentist was Mr White, and it was only as an adult when choosing my own dentist that I came to realise that Mr White had been no better than a butcher! But that was not the unusual thing about Mr Whites dental practice.
 He shared the practice with three other dentists. Their names were Mr Brown, Mr Green, and Mr Pink. I kid you not. That really was what their names were... You can verify this fact by going to the following link, and scrolling down to catalogue No. 2000.65-70.

http://www.norrismuseum.org.uk/collections/Post_medieval.asp

 Our house was in School Lane and was the end cottage of a row of five. It was quite large though as before I was born it had been a row of six, and ours was two cottages knocked into one.
 
School Lane as it is now. The cottages can be seen on the left of the image below. Our house was the one opposite the junction.

 
When I was younger. Part One: School-Lane_zps527505cc
Opposite our house was a large orchard. But by the time I was about 12 years old, and as can be seen in the image above, an estate of houses had been built where the orchard had once been. My parents had taught me never to trespass on other peoples land, but I must admit that I used to go into the orchard from time to time to sample the delicious plums and greengages that grew there...Mmmm
 To the left of our house when viewed from the front was a farm. Seventy cows where brought into the milking shed every day to be milked. If I try really hard I can still hear the hum of the milking machines today, despite the farmyard having given way to yet more new houses many years ago.
 To the right in the row our nearest neighbour was Mr & Mrs Collis, and moving on further were old Mrs Constable, Joan Brooks, and then on the opposite end to us were the Wagstaffs. These were all lovely people, and I know that mum and dad thought so as well. All the doors in this row where always open for neighbours and friends, although it has to be said that this was probably true in many communities back in the 50's and 60's.
 Apart from my mother and father I shared my house with my brothers Robert and John plus my sister Frances. Robert was my senior by about 10 years, John by 7 years, and Frances by 5 years.

Here's brother Robert holding me with Frances and John by his side.


When I was younger. Part One: Siblings_zps65c59967

As a family we were all very happy, but in the following years events were to unfold that none of the family could have foreseen.
 Before I knew it that big birthday came along, and for the first time I was allowed to leave the house without my mum by my side holding my hand. I cannot tell you how happy I was that day. It had been a long time coming, and as an added bonus now I was twenty five I'd also qualify for cheaper car insurance.
 Ok, that bit isn't strictly true...But what is true is the fact that as soon as I had gained mums trust I used to spend most evenings playing football on the village green which was only a couple of hundred yards away at the top of the lane.

The village green at the top of the lane.


When I was younger. Part One: Village-Green_zps42a8a9f2

The village green although not really the geographical centre of the village was always thought of as the village centre, and was the place where all the kids used to meet up.
Out of shot in the image above and to the right is the Primary School. On my first day there I had waited until playtime and then hidden in the cloakroom, and when all the other children had gone back to the classroom, I made my way back home to my mother. Sadly, and much to my annoyance she took me straight back and told me I was never to do that again.
 
Well...I was only five!

Turning left at the top of School Lane would put you into the High Street, and after passing the village green on your right the street takes on a slight incline. The only reason I mention that is because it's so flat in this area. Apart from a few houses the first thing anyone making their way up the High Street would have come across would have been Barwells engineering works. The main entrance was on the left just before Wallers village grocery store. Mr and Mrs Waller had a son who I became friends with after starting school at the age of five.
 
Wallers grocery store occupied what is now Foxglove furniture as is shown on the left of the image below.


When I was younger. Part One: High-Street_zpsb3a36c6b
Barwells were the biggest employer in the area and although I don't know how many people worked there, I'd guess it must have been a couple of hundred. Within a few days of passing my fifteenth birthday I was added to that number. It was there that my real education started at the "University of life"
 There were many Spanish and Italian workers at Barwells and it was one of the Spanish guys who taught me to weld. Pepe lived down the other end of the village with his wife and three children, and was one of the kindest men I have ever met. Although I didn't realise it at the time most of these dark haired swarthy looking guys took me under their wing and always looked out for me.
 During the summer a load of the guys used to play football on the village green in their dinner break. It was on one of these days that after tackling an english guy for the ball, and taking the ball off him, he chased after me and just punched me to the ground. He was about ten years older than me and a known bully.
I  jumped up with my pride hurting more than my face and thought that was the end of that.
Later on back in the welding bays I was approached by one of the Italian guys who had been told what had happened at lunchtime. This guy was well respected in the works, and was a man that whoever you where, you wouldn't want to mess with. He told me that he was upset about what he had been told, and that I only had to say the word and he would take care of him. Needless to say, this wasn't a euphemism  for "I'll be kind and caring towards him", but more like I'll see to it that he samples some hospital food. I declined his offer, but thanked him for his concern...it was tempting though!

Wallers stores closed down quite early on in my life and the family moved away. I think it was at this time that the premises became Foxglove Furniture and although the business has changed hands three or four times it is still called Foxglove today. They supplied and fitted new kitchens and bedroom furniture.
 In the image above you will see at the rear of the Foxglove premises some small out buildings. In my early twentys these buildings where converted into a sauna/mini gym, and could be rented by the hour for private use. I'd guess that I would have been in my mid twentys when one Saturday  four young local women rented the sauna for the afternoon. They were all regulars in the local pub, the White Horse. One of them was a barmaid there. They had told me about  their plans the previous evening in the pub, and added that I was more than welcome to join them should I choose to. Some of the other guys in the pub (Read all) where very envious of me, as the girls where all young and attractive. They told the other young guys in the pub that the reason I had been the only male invited to attend was because I was the only guy who they trusted enough to be naked with in a sauna. I cannot pretend that I wasn't chuffed at being invited, but stayed cool and made out in front of the pub regulars that it wasn't such a big deal.
 I excepted the invite and the next afternoon spend a happy 2 to 3 hours with the girls. More than that, I'm not at liberty to say. A few years later when one of the afore mentioned girls was about to be married, I was invited to join them on their hen night at a Cambridge night club. My then partner went on the stag night with the guys...we both had a great time!
 Trust isn't a thing that we should just pay lip service to, it is a thing to be embraced, and a code that we should all live by. The advantages of  actually living by this code far outweigh any negatives...There are no negatives!

Moving on up the High Street, Market Street can be found on the right. It's a very wide street that is the address of the White Horse public house, the villages only newsagents, and also the Post Office.


When I was younger. Part One: Market-Street_zps11c8dc1e
The newsagents can be seen in the image above to the right of the pub, and the post office is where the red van is parked...in fact the van is a royal mail van.
 I started drinking in the White Horse just after starting work at age fifteen. The landlord informed me three years later after a long spell I'd had in hospital, and hence six months away from the pub that he'd thought I was at least eighteen years of age from the very beginning. And wouldn't have known I was underage had I not told him that day that he was buying me my first legal pint of beer. Apart from the fact I'd always look much older than my years, I can only put this down to the fact that I had always gone into the pub alone, and that most people considered me quite mature for my age. Even at age fifteen most of my friends where in either their late teens or early twentys.
 Most of my time in the pub was spent playing darts. And at the age of nineteen or maybe twenty I was playing in what was called the Cambridge Super League. I used to practice every day and before long I was picked for the Cambridgeshire County side, although I should state that this was for the B side. Sadly I never made it into the A team, but it wasn't for the want of trying.

One of my favourite memories from my time in the White horse was going into the pub in the early evening and getting on the dart board to practice. Most evenings my mum and dads friend and neighbour Joan Brooks would be in the pub playing darts as well.
Joanie as she was known to most people was about the same age as my parents and used to get her fruit juice from the bar and then just the two of us would  play darts until the pub started to fill up later in the evening. She was a good player and was in the pub team. I used to tease her by messing about at the end of a game, and then just as she had got down to a double to finish, I would then hit the winning double. Sometimes though I'd come unstuck and she'd pull off a really good shot and beat me fair and square. I can still hear her laughter now, when it became her turn to tease me!
It was a very sad day indeed the day I was told of her passing away...

One summer evening I was at the bar chatting with John the local vet and there was alot of noise and shouting coming from just outside of the pub door. "Whatever is going on out there" I asked him. "They've taken that 56lb weight from the hearth, and are seeing who can lift it above their head" John said. The weight he was talking about was one of those weights that is formed so that part of the weight its self is its handle.
 We wandered outside, drinks in hand, to observe the fun the guys where having. We watched as they each took their turn lifting the weight with varying degrees of success. Only two or three of them could complete the task in hand by holding the weight above their head. I put my drink down on the sill of the pub window.
 "Let me show you how that's done" I said to the onlookers. And with that I picked up the weight from the pavement and pumped it above my head 20 times with my right arm, and then managed to repeat this with my left...but this time I could only manage 4 or 5 repetitions. One of the guys said.."Yeh, but you work in the building trade laying bricks and stuff all day, so you're bound to be better at this" I looked at John and he just smiled and shook his head as we made our way back to the bar inside.
 We ordered more drinks and he said in a low voice "I knew you were strong Frank, I just didn't realise how strong!" He smiled again and said, "I'm going to call you Bull Norman from now on".

Travelling on past Market Street and the White Horse would bring you up to Clarks corner. This is the point that the High Street ends, and Station Road begins. Mr and Mrs Clark ran a hardware store right there on the apex of the bend in the road. Since their demise, Clarks store has changed hands many times. This includes a kitchen company (My brother-in-law owned it), an opticians called Eyes of Swavesey, and also the MG Owners Club which was and still is the biggest single make car club in the world. The MG Owners Club still has its premises on the outskirts of Swavesey. If you’re interested in the old MG sports cars try googling MG Owners club.

Just round the corner in Station Road can be found Swan Pond. The actual pond its self is just behind the tree in the centre of the image below. On the right of the image and out of view are some lovely little cottages. It was in one of these that my dear friend, darting partner, and wise advisor Joanie lived out the remainder of her life after leaving School Lane.


When I was younger. Part One: Swan-Pond_zps19659b0e
A couple of hundred yards further on the left can be found St.Andrews church. The church is situated just this side of what used to be the St.Ives to Cambridge railway line. The railway line was done away with a few years back, and replaced with a guided busway.
 The text here has given you a few snippets of my memories and thoughts of times gone by. I’m now going to travel back again to a time that although I was not to know then, something would happen that would affect the lives of my whole family forever more.
 That day would have started out in just the same way as many before. The date was Wednesday 8th November 1961. At only six years old I have no memory of what I did during that day, except to say that like my older brothers and sister I would have been at school.
 My first and only memory of that day was walking with my mother and father up the lane, and then towards the High Street. It would have been around teatime. They walked at a brisk pace causing me to break into a trot every few steps in order to keep up. When we got to Wallers stores on the High Street we went inside the shop and I was told that I would be having tea with Mr and Mrs Wallers son. I hadn’t been here for tea before, so it was probably a bit of an adventure.
 
I now have to rely on what I have been told as an adult as to why that day was so different.
My brother John had had a dreadful accident at Swavesey railway station. He’d been run over and killed by a goods train passing through the station. He was only thirteen years old at the time. Nobody has ever been certain of how the accident happened, but we know that after school he’d gone there to catch a train to St.Ives. We also know that the accident happened at 4.22pm. The ticket office at this small rural station was on the far side platform as you approached from the village. John would have had to cross the line to buy his ticket. It’s been said he may have thought that the goods train was in fact the passenger train and that it was stopping, and as such he ran across the line straight into its path. We never will know for sure what John was thinking that day.
 Right up until the day they died my parents kept a glass fronted dresser in the front room with many of Johns possessions in it. These included a small box that was decorated with tiny sea shells. Inside the box was a sixpence that directly after the accident had been found on the front buffer of the train. As a small boy I often used to gaze through the glass at the odd things I could see, sometimes asking my mother questions about the precious items on the other side of the glass.
 Within a year of that dreadful day I was told that I would have a new baby brother or sister. My father told me many years later that is what the family doctor had advised would be a good thing for my mother. The thought being that a new child may help to occupy my mothers mind, and although nothing could stop her from dwelling on the past, It may at least help to minimise it.

It wasn’t long before Jennifer Georgina Norman was born. Everyone who knew her called her Jenny. Although my memories of Jennys early years are at best very misty, I think that as Jenny grew we became closer. I imagine that having a baby sister gave me a new identity, and as I went into my teens it would be true to say that I was very proud to be a big brother. I’m sure it helped me to mature faster than I would have as the baby of the family.
 It was fortunate as well that at about the same time that Jenny was born, Mr and Mrs Wagstaff at the other end of the cottages had a baby son. As time went by Richard and Jenny became the best of playmates.
 By the time Jenny reached the age of eleven or twelve she was of course attending Swavesey village college. The college was only 3 to 4 minutes walk from our house and within the college grounds was a purpose built youth club. And although I had spent many evenings at the club myself, I had left all that behind me 3 or 4 years previously. I can still remember Jenny wanting to stay a little later at a youth club disco than mum was happy with. I used to step in and say, “Oh, go on mum. Let her stay later. I’ll go round there and walk her back, to make sure she’s ok”. Mum would mostly give in then, and say “Ok then, but you’d better come out at 10 sharp...Frank will be waiting for you!” Jenny would thank her mother and give me a big beaming smile. I was more than happy to do this for my baby sister...

I think it was just before her thirteenth birthday that Jenny started complaining about getting headaches. A while later she was diagnosed with having two brain tumours. As the weeks went by she endured many tests and periods of time in hospital. Treatment followed and as an added blow she had to lose all of her beautiful chestnut red hair. We were all still very hopeful that the treatment would bring positive results, avoiding the need for any surgery.
 For the times when Jenny was at home a bed was made up for her in one of the downstairs rooms. This not only made it easier for mum to care for her, but also ensured that Jenny didn’t feel left out of things at home. While in hospital there was never any shortage of visitors for Jenny. One of the regular visitors was a young 25 year old guy  that you may have heard of. His name was Joe Bugner. For those of you that aren’t sure who this is, if I was to tell you that Joe went fifteen rounds with Muhammad Ali in this same year, that may give a clue.
 The visits from Joe came about after he met Jenny while visiting a nephew in the same ward. He was an absolutely fantastic guy, and continued to visit after his nephew had gone home. I know that this gave Jenny a big lift.
 It became apparent that the treatment was not working. Surgery was not an option either because of the position of the tumours within Jennys brain. Jenny was brought home and made as comfortable as possible.

We all knew that it was only a matter of time before Jennys battle would be over. At that time I was working for a well known plant hire firm that supplied a van with the job. The evening came when on returning from work I had turned at the top of School Lane and straight away spotted my aunts car parked outside mum and dads house. My aunt very rarely came to visit, and straight away I feared the worst.
I cannot even begin to describe the atmosphere inside the house. I walked straight through the kitchen and living room into the bedroom that had been set up for Jenny. She appeared to be asleep but I knew she was dying. I gently took her hand, and probably spoke, but I can’t remember. Her fingers closed weakly around mine and almost as quickly she released her gentle grip. My beautiful baby sister was no longer with us...
 The little girl who only came into existence because of the death of the brother she never knew had been cruelly taken from the parents who never stopped loving either of them.

After that day I saw Jenny one last time laid out in her coffin. Whoever had taken care of laying her out had done a wonderful job. She looked better that day than I had seen her look in many weeks.


When I was younger. Part One: Church-Path_zps141237c4
Jenny and Johns grave can be seen on the left of the church path in the above image. Their resting place is the white grave between the two large trees. They were joined in 1996 in the same grave by the mum and dad who adored them both.
 I’ve been to many funerals over the years. None of them have affected me in the same way as Jennys did. After following the coffin into the church, other than the church organ, we were greeted by silence. It was estimated that there was around 400 people inside the church, many of them children from Jennys school.
 The silence was suddenly broken by a single person sobbing, this audible sign of sorrow was soon joined by another, and then there were ten...and then there were hundreds...
 
 
Thankyou for taking the time to read.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Tue Oct 15, 2013 3:03 am

Thanks so much for sharing Part One of your life with us, Frank.
That would have been so hard to write about Jenny and John even after all this time.
The last part of your post reduced me to tears.
So sad, mate

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by June on Tue Oct 15, 2013 3:59 am

Thank you for telling part of your story Frank. It has reduced me to tears as well.  Such sad events, although they happen to everyone at some point, always break my heart.

Your village looks a lovely place and I'm glad that you had a happy childhood and at least some time with all your brothers and sisters.

Even after all this time I know it must still be painful for you to remember but memories are all we have to keep. hug
June
June
June
June

Posts : 77197
Join date : 2009-12-16
Age : 75
Location : Lancashire

Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Tue Oct 15, 2013 4:21 am

Thank you for such a wonderful story about your life Frank. It is early tuesday morning here and like our Dougie and our June I could feel the tears well up after reading the end of such a wonderful piece.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Tan on Tue Oct 15, 2013 5:36 am

Thank you our Frank for saying about part one of your life.
I too am reduced to tears to hear of what happened to your precious Brother and Sister, so tragic for sure, and both so much loved by you and your family.
So hard for anyone to try and come to terms with that happening, once, least of all twice in one family. hug 

Sorry to hear you had spent a while in hospital, hopefully from coming out all went well from then for you.
Such a lovely village there you lived in, so quaint it looks, and such lovely memories of so much there of your younger life, and onwards.

_________________
When I was younger. Part One: JoG8FLI   When I was younger. Part One: RC1yQw3 bow  ttea
Tan
Tan
TTR Administrator
TTR Administrator

Posts : 266212
Join date : 2009-11-12
Age : 64
Location : Lancashire

Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:42 am

What an incredible place to spend your early childhood years and I so enjoyed reading about your family and seeing the photos, too, Frank.

But to realize your brother John had been killed and then your little sister Jenny dying, I honestly can not begin to imagine what it must have been like for you and your parents, really I can't.

To share your life like this is such an honour and thank you ever so much, our Frank!

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Nev on Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:12 am

Starting from near your beginnings Frank, I also was dragged to a butcher of a dentist, as one of many during my formative years, the good ones, they passed unnoticed really. It was just the one, who through his painful mess, made me damned near phobic about dentists and why my teeth are such a mess, and very few left now.

The photographs and your descriptions of how it once was, especially the orchard where now is a typical housing estate, reminds me off many places in my area where once we played as children, are now also built over.

Friends made at school, friends made later in life, and the bullies all make for your own way of dealing with life as you grow, unfortunately though for me I was an only child with no brothers or sisters, and from what little I was told, my mother could never have another. Details of that are sketchy as I was never told the full story as it must have been too traumatic for my parents, though I believe I was the only one to survive from others before me.
Early working life, likewise made me aware of the world in a different perspective from childhood too.
However, like those before me, the loss of both brother John, which although young it must have hit hard for you at the time, and then later the tragic loss of your younger sister Jenny, it also brought tears. So very sad Frank and my feelings go with you on that.

Thank you for sharing your life though, and one other important point you mention about life, and that is trust. Without trust and the knowledge you have that and also give it, life ain't worth much.

Nev
~ God Bless you our Nev ~
~ God Bless you our Nev ~

Posts : 17308
Join date : 2009-11-17
Location : Blackburn Lancashire

Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Mon Oct 21, 2013 10:25 pm

This thread is about Franks early life and rather than fill up his thread with snippets of your early lives, why not start your own thread.Very Happy
Would love to read about other members early years in detail as well.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:57 pm

Oh gosh, I'm sorry you had a lousy dentist too, Nev - and I bet Frank can really really sympathize!!

Frank ... did your parents ever really 'bounce back' after the death  of your brother and then your sister Jenny?

I do understand if you'd rather than answer ... I'm not trying to be nosy, just trying to understand the strength it must take to survive the death of two children ... am just so so damn sorry that life can often be so cruel to the nicest of people - huge sigh.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:37 am

Mara wrote:

Frank ... did your parents ever really 'bounce back' after the death  of your brother and then your sister Jenny?

When my brother was killed I was too young I think to register the effect on the rest of my family. But when my sister died, that was different. Although myself and my siblings never witnessed any open show of grief from our parents, we were all wise enough to recognise the pain behind their eyes...they would never be quiet the same again. But in answer to your question Mara, yes they did bounce back...just not to the same place they had once been.
Many, many years later I remember my mother telling me of the nights my father had sobbed quietly into his pillow before eventually giving way to sleep..

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by honeybee on Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:02 am

Lovely village our Frank. So well written.  I was sad reading about Jenny and John. What a beautiful village
Kiss
honeybee
honeybee
Our Smilie Queen
Our Smilie Queen

Posts : 116955
Join date : 2009-11-12
Age : 69
Location : Johannesburg, South Africa

Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:08 pm

Oh Frank, I'm so relieved to read that, as the years went by, your parents were able to forge onward and what courage it must have taken. 

But can only imagine the hole left in their hearts with the loss of both John and Jenny and in your heart, as well, dear man.

Being with your Jenny when she died ... so incredibly sad for you yet what a beautiful gift to your dear sister (I'm not saying this well, I know) and I suspect you so often think of her with love, even now, our Frank.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Alan on Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:19 pm

Thank you so much for sharing your early years with us, Frank, you really write so well and with such emotion. Have you ever considered publishing? I think that you would do very well.

I loved reading about your little village and all the people with whom you were involved, but oh so sad to read about your brother, John, and your dear little sister, Jenny, how heart breaking for you , your lovely parents and the rest of the family.

Like the others I found myself reduced to tears at the end of your life story.

I look forward with anticipation to Part Two, and thank you so much once again, Frank Very Happy

_________________
When I was younger. Part One: Bwana_10   

"To know an elephant is to be touched by him - these gentle giants humble mankind. He is nature's greatest Masterpiece." John Donne - Poet
Alan
Alan
Consultant
Consultant

Posts : 24628
Join date : 2009-11-12
Age : 69
Location : Johannesburg, South Africa

Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Joelle on Tue Oct 22, 2013 3:05 pm

Frank, thank you for writing about your early life here and sharing your memories with us. It is so interesting to read about your early life and see the photos too, but then the terrible tragedies reading about your poor brother and sister's deaths is so terribly sad, and so heartbreaking to read about it. You have a wonderful style of writing and I look forward to reading more.
Joelle
Joelle
Joelle
Joelle

Posts : 40889
Join date : 2009-11-12
Age : 81
Location : West Yorkshire England

http://www.pamspoetry.yolasite.com

Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Wed Oct 23, 2013 12:17 am

I'd like to thank everyone here for both your kind comments and the empathy you have all shown.
In the near future, and as time permits I will be starting a "Part Two".

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Guest on Wed Oct 23, 2013 12:35 pm

I too am looking so forward to reading 'part two', Frank - thank  you for this lovely gift of sharing your life with us! flower

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

When I was younger. Part One: Empty Re: When I was younger. Part One:

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You can reply to topics in this forum